Arab Christians In British Mandate Palestine Communalism And Nationalism 1917 1948 PDF Download

Arab Christians in British Mandate Palestine  Communalism and Nationalism  1917 1948 PDF
Author: Noah Haiduc-Dale
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Size: 75.90 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 232
View: 342

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Recent conflict in the Middle East has caused some observers to ask if Muslims and Christians can ever coexist. History suggests that relations between those two groups are not predetermined, but are the product of particular social and political circumstances. This book examines Muslim-Christian relations during an earlier period of political and social upheaval, and explores the process of establishing new forms of national and religious identification. Palestine's Arab Christian minority actively engaged with the Palestinian nationalist movement throughout the period of British rule (1917-1948). Relations between Muslim and Christian Arabs were sometimes strained, yet in Palestine, as in other parts of the world, communalism became a specific response to political circumstances. While Arab Christians first adopted an Arab nationalist identity, a series of outside pressures - including British policies, the rise of a religious conflict between Jews and Muslims, and an increase in Islamic identification among some Arabs - led Christians to adhere to more politicized religious groupings by the 1940s. Yet despite that shift Christians remained fully nationalist, insisting that they could be both Arab and Christian.

Arab Christians In British Mandate Palestine PDF Download

Arab Christians in British Mandate Palestine PDF
Author: Noah Haiduc-Dale
Publisher:
Size: 13.18 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 221
View: 1618

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Shows how Arab Christians struggled to balance religious and nationalist identities in Palestine between 1917 and 1948. Noah Haiduc-Dale focuses on the relationship between Arab Christians and the nationalist movement in Palestine as the British Mandate unfolded throughout the first half of the 20th century. Evidence of individual behaviours and beliefs, as well as those of Christian organizations (both religious and social in nature), challenges the prevailing assumption that Arab Christians were prone to communalism. Instead, they were as likely as their Muslim compatriots to support nationalism. When social pressure led Christians to identify along communal lines, they did so in conjunction with a stronger dedication to nationalism.

The Global History Of The Balfour Declaration PDF Download

The Global History of the Balfour Declaration PDF
Author: Maryanne A. Rhett
Publisher: Routledge
Size: 49.25 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 168
View: 1513

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This book examines the development and issuance of the Balfour Declaration, the document that set the stage for the creation of the state of Israel, within its global setting. The heart of the book demonstrates that the Declaration developed and contributed to a juncture in a global dialogue about the nature and definition of nation at the outset of the twentieth century. Embedded in this examination are gendered, racial, nationalistic, and imperial considerations. The work posits that the Balfour Declaration was a specific tool designed by the manipulation of these ideas. Once established, the Declaration helped, and hindered, established imperial powers like the British, nascent imperial powers like the Japanese and Indians, and emerging nationalist movements like the Zionists, Irish, Palestinians, and East Africans, to advocate for their own vision of national definition.

Between Dixie And Zion PDF Download

Between Dixie and Zion PDF
Author: Walker Robins
Publisher: University Alabama Press
Size: 63.51 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 247
View: 2952

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Explores the roots of evangelical Christian support for Israel through an examination of the Southern Baptist Convention One week after the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, delegates to the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) repeatedly and overwhelmingly voted down resolutions congratulating fellow Southern Baptist Harry Truman on his role in Israel’s creation. From today’s perspective, this seems like a shocking result. After all, Christians—particularly the white evangelical Protestants that populate the SBC—are now the largest pro-Israel constituency in the United States. How could conservative evangelicals have been so hesitant in celebrating Israel’s birth in 1948? How did they then come to be so supportive? Between Dixie and Zion: Southern Baptists and Palestine before Israel addresses these issues by exploring how Southern Baptists engaged what was called the “Palestine question”: whether Jews or Arabs would, or should, control the Holy Land after World War I. Walker Robins argues that, in the decades leading up to the creation of Israel, most Southern Baptists did not directly engage the Palestine question politically. Rather, they engaged it indirectly through a variety of encounters with the land, the peoples, and the politics of Palestine. Among the instrumental figures featured by Robins are tourists, foreign missionaries, Arab pastors, Jewish converts, biblical interpreters, fundamentalist rebels, editorialists, and, of course, even a president. While all revered Palestine as the Holy Land, each approached and encountered the region according to their own priorities. Nevertheless, Robins shows that Baptists consistently looked at the region through an Orientalist framework, broadly associating the Zionist movement with Western civilization, modernity, and progress over and against the Arabs, whom they viewed as uncivilized, premodern, and backward. He argues that such impressions were not idle—they suggested that the Zionists were fulfilling Baptists’ long-expressed hopes that the Holy Land would one day be revived and regain the prosperity it had held in the biblical era.

Partitioning Palestine PDF Download

Partitioning Palestine PDF
Author: Penny Sinanoglou
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Size: 61.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 256
View: 5930

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Partitioning Palestine is the first history of the ideological and political forces that led to the idea of partition—that is, a division of territory and sovereignty—in British mandate Palestine in the first half of the twentieth century. Inverting the spate of narratives that focus on how the idea contributed to, or hindered, the development of future Israeli and Palestinian states, Penny Sinanoglou asks instead what drove and constrained British policymaking around partition, and why partition was simultaneously so appealing to British policymakers yet ultimately proved so difficult for them to enact. Taking a broad view not only of local and regional factors, but also of Palestine’s place in the British empire and its status as a League of Nations mandate, Sinanoglou deftly recasts the story of partition in Palestine as a struggle to maintain imperial control. After all, British partition plans imagined space both for a Zionist state indebted to Britain and for continued British control over key geostrategic assets, depending in large part on the forced movement of Arab populations. With her detailed look at the development of the idea of partition from its origins in the 1920s, Sinanoglou makes a bold contribution to our understanding of the complex interplay between internationalism and imperialism at the end of the British empire and reveals the legacies of British partitionist thinking in the broader history of decolonization in the modern Middle East.

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Author: Річард Докінз
Publisher: Family Leisure Club
Size: 52.20 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : uk
Pages :
View: 7319

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•Світовий бестселер, який має прочитати кожен •Від автора сенсаційного «Егоїстичного гену» •Перекладено понад тридцятьма мовами Річард Докінз спонукає читача неупереджено поглянути на сенс релігії, не нав’язуючи власної думки, а заохочуючи до самостійних роздумів і висновків. Автор розглядає особливості так званої «ейнштейнівської релігії», за якою Бог — це метафора на позначення загадковості Всесвіту, критикує «гіпотезу про Бога», осмислює, чи дійсно релігія є регулятором моральності, розкриває значення еволюції та природного добору. Кожну свою тезу науковець підкріплює цікавими історичними фактами та посиланнями на достовірні джерела. Нарешті один із провідних науковців сьогодення зібрав усі свої міркування щодо релігії в цю надзвичайну книжку.Стівен Пінкер, професор психології Гарвардського університету.

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Author:
Publisher: Taras Tsymbal
Size: 61.66 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : European literature
Languages : uk
Pages : 605
View: 7219

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One World PDF Download

One World PDF
Author:
Publisher:
Size: 77.65 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : International organization
Languages : en
Pages :
View: 6708

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