Making The American Home PDF Download

Making the American Home PDF
Author: Marilyn Ferris Motz
Publisher: Popular Press
Size: 74.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Family & Relationships
Languages : en
Pages : 212
View: 7227

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The transformation of a house into a home has been in our culture a traditional task of women. The articles examine this process as they reflected the role of American middle-class women as homemakers in the years 1840–1940.

Making The American Mouth PDF Download

Making the American Mouth PDF
Author: Alyssa Picard
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
Size: 76.57 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Medical
Languages : en
Pages : 242
View: 835

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Why are Americans so uniquely obsessed with teeth? Brilliantly white, straight teeth? Making the American Mouth is at once a history of United States dentistry and a study of a billion-dollar industry. Alyssa Picard chronicles the forces that limited Americans' access to dental care in the early twentieth century and the ways dentists worked to expand that access--and improve the public image of their profession. Comprehensive in scope, this work describes how dentists' early public health commitments withered under the strain of fights over fluoride, mid-century social movements for racial and gender equity, and pressure to insure dental costs. It explains how dentists came to promote cosmetic services, and why Americans were so eager to purchase them. As we move into the twentyfirst century, dentists' success in shaping their industry means that for many, the perfect American smile will remain a distant--though tantalizing--dream.

Making The American Dream Work PDF Download

Making the American Dream Work PDF
Author: Lauranett Lee
Publisher: Morgan James Publishing
Size: 31.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 252
View: 5464

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What can a small industrial city in Virginia named Hopewell tell us about its experiment in possibilities? Located at the intersection of the Appomattox and James Rivers, this wondrous place was poised to yield "the greatest hope ever." From America's founding years to the twenty-first century Hopewell's historic sights and the stories that citizens tell about their lives provide glimpses into an ever changing landscape that embodies all the American dream has come to symbolize.

Making The American Body PDF Download

Making the American Body PDF
Author: Jonathan Black
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
Size: 46.38 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Health & Fitness
Languages : en
Pages : 256
View: 3427

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If you thought the fitness craze was about being healthy, think again. Although Charles Atlas, Jack LaLanne, Jim Fixx, Jane Fonda, Richard Simmons, and Jillian Michaels might well point the way to a better body, they have done so only if their brands brought in profits. In the first book to tell the full story of the American obsession with fitness and how we got to where we are today, Jonathan Black gives us a backstage look at an industry and the people that have left an indelible mark on the American body and the consciousness it houses. Spanning the nation’s fitness obsession from Atlas to Arnold, from Spinning to Zumba, and featuring an outrageous cast of characters bent on whipping us into shape while simultaneously shaping the way we view our bodies, Black tells the story of an outsized but little-examined aspect of our culture. With insights drawn from more than fifty interviews and attention to key developments in bodybuilding, aerobics, equipment, health clubs, running, sports medicine, group exercise, Pilates, and yoga, Making the American Body reveals how a focus on fitness has shaped not only our physiques but also, and more profoundly, American ideas of what “fitness” is.

Making The American Team PDF Download

Making the American Team PDF
Author: Mark Dyreson
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Size: 57.78 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 269
View: 2114

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One day in front of the television would convince any alien that the entirety of American culture is built around sports. Politics and business are abustle with sports metaphors and endorsements by athletes. "Home runs," "bottom of the ninth," "fourth and ten," "slam dunk," and similar phrases litter the daily vocabulary. No matter how dire the news, sports will be reported as usual. How did this single-minded fascination come to be? Mark Dyreson locates the invasion of sport at the heart of American culture at the turn of the century. It was then that social reformers and political leaders believed that sport could revitalize the "republican experiment," that a new sense of national identity could forge a new sense of community and a healthy political order as it would serve to link America's thinking classes with the experiences of the masses. Nowhere was this better exemplified than in American accounts of the Olympic Games held between 1896 and 1912. In connecting sport to American history and culture, Dyreson has stepped up to the plate and hit one out of the park. A volume in the series Sport and Society, edited by Benjamin G. Rader and Randy Roberts

The American Home Front 1941 1942 PDF Download

The American Home Front  1941   1942 PDF
Author: Alistair Cooke
Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
Size: 62.25 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 352
View: 4048

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New York Times bestseller: This portrait of the United States at the beginning of World War II is “an unexpected and welcome discovery in a time capsule” (The Washington Post). In nearly three thousand BBC broadcasts over fifty-eight years, Alistair Cooke reported on America, illuminating our country for a global audience. Shortly before he passed away, a long-forgotten manuscript resurfaced in a closet in his New York apartment. It was a travelogue of America during the early days of World War II that had sat there for sixty years. Published to stellar reviews, Cooke’s The American Home Front is a “valentine to his adopted country by someone who loved it as well as anyone and knew it better than most” (The Plain Dealer). A portrait frozen in time, the book offers a charming look at the era as it journeys through small towns, big cities, and the American landscape as they once were. The American Home Front is also a brilliant piece of reportage, a historical gem that “affirms Cooke’s enduring place as a great twentieth-century reporter” (American Heritage). “An interesting eyewitness record . . . It recalls transcontinental travel in the pre-interstate highway era, and with greater depth, social problems that Cooke detected beneath the win-the-war exhortations he encountered from coast to coast.” —Booklist

Transpacific Field Of Dreams PDF Download

Transpacific Field of Dreams PDF
Author: Sayuri Guthrie-Shimizu
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
Size: 45.47 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 344
View: 1622

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Baseball has joined America and Japan, even in times of strife, for over 150 years. After the "opening" of Japan by Commodore Perry, Sayuri Guthrie-Shimizu explains, baseball was introduced there by American employees of the Japanese government tasked with bringing Western knowledge and technology to the country, and Japanese students in the United States soon became avid players. In the early twentieth century, visiting Japanese warships fielded teams that played against American teams, and a Negro League team arranged tours to Japan. By the 1930s, professional baseball was organized in Japan where it continued to be played during and after World War II; it was even played in Japanese American internment camps in the United States during the war. From early on, Guthrie-Shimizu argues, baseball carried American values to Japan, and by the mid-twentieth century, the sport had become emblematic of Japan's modernization and of America's growing influence in the Pacific world. Guthrie-Shimizu contends that baseball provides unique insight into U.S.-Japanese relations during times of war and peace and, in fact, is central to understanding postwar reconciliation. In telling this often surprising history, Transpacific Field of Dreams shines a light on globalization's unlikely, and at times accidental, participants.

Immigrant Minds American Identities PDF Download

Immigrant Minds  American Identities PDF
Author: Orm Øverland
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Size: 17.54 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 243
View: 2598

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Devised by individual ethnic leaders and spread through ethnic media, banquets, and rallies, these myths were a response to being marginalized by the dominant group and a way of laying claim to a legitimate home in America."--BOOK JACKET.

The Broken American Male PDF Download

The Broken American Male PDF
Author: Shmuley Boteach
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Size: 76.90 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Family & Relationships
Languages : en
Pages : 304
View: 1585

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Why do American husbands come home from work too exhausted to interact with their families? When did a healthy quest for prosperity become a twisted game no one can win? How did BlackBerries and internet porn become more interesting to men than their flesh-and-blood spouses? Shmuley Boteach has made a great study of how families live today—both in his work as a rabbi privately and as host of TLC's "Shalom in the Home". He's discovered a disturbing common thread in the families he meets: men responding to the pressure of competition in their work lives by turning away from their loved ones. In a world that judges men by the size of their paychecks and the wattage of their fame, it's all too easy to lose sight of what is truly valuable in life. Men who consider themselves failures and don't love themselves turn into stressed-out dads, distracted husbands and miserable human beings. For these men, alcohol, the internet and sporting events serve as numbing stand-ins for read life. In THE BROKEN AMERICAN MALE, Boteach doesn't just outline the problems facing marriages and nuclear families. He also offers practical, inspiring solutions, showing how wives can reach out to their husbands, helping them become heroes again to their own families.

The Children S Culture Reader PDF Download

The Children s Culture Reader PDF
Author: Henry Jenkins
Publisher: NYU Press
Size: 38.57 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Family & Relationships
Languages : en
Pages : 532
View: 3739

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Stock market euphoria and blind faith in the post cold war economy have driven the topic of poverty from popular and scholarly discussion in the United States. At the same time the gap between the rich and poor has never been wider. The New Poverty Studies critically examines the new war against the poor that has accompanied the rise of the New Economy in the past two decades, and details the myriad ways poor people have struggled against it. The essays collected here explore how global, national, and local structures of power produce poverty and affect the material well-being, social relations and politicization of the poor. In updating the 1960s encounter between ethnography and U.S. poverty, The New Poverty Studies highlights the ways poverty is constructed across multiple scales and multiple axes of difference. Questioning the common wisdom that poverty persists because of the pathology, social isolation and welfare state "dependency" of the poor, the contributors to The New Poverty Studies point instead to economic restructuring and neoliberal policy "reforms" which have caused increased social inequality and economic polarization in the U.S. Contributors include: Georges Fouron, Donna Goldstein, Judith Goode, Susan B. Hyatt, Catherine Kingfisher, Peter Kwong, Vin Lyon-Callo, Jeff Maskovsky, Sandi Morgen, Leith Mullings, Frances Fox Piven, Matthew Rubin, Nina Glick Schiller, Carol Stack, Jill Weigt, Eve Weinbaum, Brett Williams, and Patricia Zavella. "These contributions provide a dynamic understanding of poverty and immiseration" --North American Dialogue, Vol. 4, No. 1, Nov. 2001