The Dominant Party System

The Dominant Party System PDF
Author: Heidi Brooks
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 63.55 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : South Africa
Languages : un
Pages : 24

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The Dominant Party System

by Heidi Brooks, The Dominant Party System Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download The Dominant Party System books,



Why Dominant Parties Lose

Why Dominant Parties Lose PDF
Author: Kenneth F. Greene
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139466860
Size: 67.60 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Political Science
Languages : un
Pages :

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Why Dominant Parties Lose

by Kenneth F. Greene, Why Dominant Parties Lose Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Why Dominant Parties Lose books, Why have dominant parties persisted in power for decades in countries spread across the globe? Why did most eventually lose? Why Dominant Parties Lose develops a theory of single-party dominance, its durability, and its breakdown into fully competitive democracy. Greene shows that dominant parties turn public resources into patronage goods to bias electoral competition in their favor and virtually win elections before election day without resorting to electoral fraud or bone-crushing repression. Opposition parties fail because their resource disadvantages force them to form as niche parties with appeals that are out of step with the average voter. When the political economy of dominance erodes, the partisan playing field becomes fairer and opposition parties can expand into catchall competitors that threaten the dominant party at the polls. Greene uses this argument to show why Mexico transformed from a dominant party authoritarian regime under PRI rule to a fully competitive democracy.



Harbingers Of Change

Harbingers of Change  PDF
Author: Danielle Langfield
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 70.59 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category :
Languages : un
Pages : 343

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Harbingers Of Change

by Danielle Langfield, Harbingers Of Change Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Harbingers Of Change books, Abstract: Democratic dominant party systems hold fair but uncompetitive competitions. In a democratic country in which one political party wins national elections repeatedly and continuously, what determines whether it will become competitive, authoritarian, or if it will maintain both dominance and democracy? Prior work on this question generally has taken a view of party system evolution as a result either of top-down ruling elite factionalism or of grassroots-based opposition growth. I link the two processes, arguing that competitiveness emerges from a combination of a weakening dominant party and a growing opposition. The dominant party's attitude to interparty and intraparty opposition, and the opposition's viability as a credible alternative largely determine the evolution of a dominant party system. I use a multi-level approach, looking explicitly at the role of subnational party systems in a nationally dominant party system to gain analytical leverage. I evaluate both explicit efforts to spread subnational opposition success to other localities and to other levels of government, and the ruling party's attempts to thwart these efforts. To support this theory, I draw extensively on literature about a diverse set of countries, including India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, and several states of sub-Saharan Africa. Then, I turn to an analysis of South African cities, using my own interviews with party elites, newspaper accounts, and archival sources to compare increasingly competitive Cape Town and increasingly African National Congress (ANC)-dominant Durban through the 2009 elections. This period coincides with a fraught succession fight within the ANC, culminating in severe factionalism with geographic bases and an organized defection to form a separate party. The weakened ANC created opportunities for opposition growth. I argue that opposition parties are most likely to find traction with strategies that, first, build their credibility through winning and governing subnational governments and, second, capitalize on voters' doubts about the democratic credentials of the dominant party in order to capture some of the electoral center. However, democracy's contested status may damage the quality of democracy and consolidation of the regime. Based on survey data drawn from the Afrobarometer and the Comparative National Election Project, South Africans are disillusioned with their democratic system in ways we expect and they support democracy in the abstract. However, there are reasons for concern about the public's reaction if the dominant party were to lose national power. I conclude that the evolution of dominant party systems into competitive ones may be a double-edged sword; competitive parties should yield a better functioning democracy, but the process of achieving that competitiveness risks political instability.



The Awkward Embrace

The Awkward Embrace PDF
Author: Hermann Giliomee
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135297169
Size: 62.46 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Political Science
Languages : un
Pages : 368

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The Awkward Embrace

by Hermann Giliomee, The Awkward Embrace Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download The Awkward Embrace books, Democracies derive their resilience and vitality from the fact that the rule of a particular majority is usually only of a temporary nature. By looking at four case-studies, The Awkward Embrace studies democracies of a different kind; rule by a dominant party which is virtually immune from defeat. Such systems have been called Regnant or or Uncommon Democracies. They are characterized by distinctive features: the staging of unfree or corrupt elections; the blurring of the lines between government, the ruling party and the state; the introduction of a national project which is seen to be above politics; and the erosion of civil society. This book addresses major issues such as why one such democracy, namely Taiwan, has been moving in the direction of a more competitive system; how economic crises such as the present one in Mexico can transform the system; how government-business relations in Malaysia are affecting the base of the dominant party; and whether South Africa will become a one-party dominant system.



Dominant Political Parties And Democracy

Dominant Political Parties and Democracy PDF
Author: Matthijs Bogaards
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136960082
Size: 28.28 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Political Science
Languages : un
Pages : 256

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Dominant Political Parties And Democracy

by Matthijs Bogaards, Dominant Political Parties And Democracy Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Dominant Political Parties And Democracy books, This book examines dominant parties in both established democracies and new democracies and explores the relationship between dominant parties and the democratic process. Bridging existing literatures, the authors analyse dominant parties at national and sub-national, district and intra-party levels and take a fresh look at some of the classic cases of one-party dominance. The book also features methodological advances in the study of dominant parties through contributions that develop new ways of conceptualizing and measuring one-party dominance. Combining theoretical and empirical research and bringing together leading experts in the field - including Hermann Giliomee and Kenneth Greene - this book features comparisons and case studies on Japan, Canada, Germany, Mexico, Italy, France and South Africa. This book will be of interest to students and scholars of political science, democracy studies, comparative politics, party politics and international studies specialists.



The Quality Of Democracy In Africa

The Quality of Democracy in Africa PDF
Author: Jonathan van Eerd
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319508385
Size: 40.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Political Science
Languages : un
Pages : 272

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The Quality Of Democracy In Africa

by Jonathan van Eerd, The Quality Of Democracy In Africa Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download The Quality Of Democracy In Africa books, This book shows that democratization in sub-Saharan Africa can be successful, even if the government remains dominated by one major political party. If an institutionalized and strong opposition party – even when too weak to take power – challenges the dominant government party, the quality of democracy improves substantially. The comparative study demonstrates that competitive opposition parties in dominant party systems are rooted in the historical legacy of political cleavages related to de-colonization that precede the third wave of democratization of the 1990s and have survived the instability of post-independence political developments to the present day. The study covers 19 African countries and 55 elections overall, including four in-depth case studies of Botswana, Lesotho, Ghana and Mali. It offers scholars and practitioners of electoral democracies and competitive authoritarian regimes a novel view on the role of party systems in processes of democratization. It makes an important contribution to the general literature on state building intertwined with democratization and representation in old and new democracies.