The Immigrant Threat

The Immigrant Threat PDF
Author: Leo Lucassen
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252030468
Size: 27.69 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : un
Pages : 277

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The Immigrant Threat

by Leo Lucassen, The Immigrant Threat Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download The Immigrant Threat books, 'The Immigrant Threat' is an exploration of the common threads in the long-term integration experience of migrants past and present. The geographic sources of the 'threat' have changed and successfully incorporated immigrants of the past have become invisible in national histories.



Immigrant Labor And The New Precariat

Immigrant Labor and the New Precariat PDF
Author: Ruth Milkman
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745692052
Size: 20.32 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : un
Pages : 200

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Immigrant Labor And The New Precariat

by Ruth Milkman, Immigrant Labor And The New Precariat Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Immigrant Labor And The New Precariat books, Immigration has been a contentious issue for decades, but in the twenty-first century it has moved to center stage, propelled by an immigrant threat narrative that blames foreign-born workers, and especially the undocumented, for the collapsing living standards of American workers. According to that narrative, if immigration were summarily curtailed, border security established, and ""illegal aliens"" removed, the American Dream would be restored. In this book, Ruth Milkman demonstrates that immigration is not the cause of economic precarity and growing inequality, as Trump and other promoters of the immigrant threat narrative claim. Rather, the influx of low-wage immigrants since the 1970s was a consequence of concerted employer efforts to weaken labor unions, along with neoliberal policies fostering outsourcing, deregulation, and skyrocketing inequality. These dynamics have remained largely invisible to the public. The justifiable anger of US-born workers whose jobs have been eliminated or degraded has been tragically misdirected, with even some liberal voices recently advocating immigration restriction. This provocative book argues that progressives should instead challenge right-wing populism, redirecting workers' anger toward employers and political elites, demanding upgraded jobs for foreign-born and US-born workers alike, along with public policies to reduce inequality.



To Be An Immigrant

To Be an Immigrant PDF
Author: Kay Deaux
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 1610441532
Size: 76.82 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Social Science
Languages : un
Pages : 272

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To Be An Immigrant

by Kay Deaux, To Be An Immigrant Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download To Be An Immigrant books, Immigration is often discussed in broad, statistical terms, with a focus on how it affects labor markets, schools, and social services. But at its most basic level, immigration is a process that affects people and their identities in deeply personal ways. In To Be an Immigrant, social psychologist Kay Deaux explores the role of both social conditions and individual capacities in determining how well immigrants adapt to life in their new homelands, and makes a strong case for the relevance of social psychology in immigration studies. To Be an Immigrant looks at how immigrants are defined, shaped, and challenged by the cultural environment they encounter in their new country and offers an integrated psychological framework for studying the immigrant experience. Deaux argues that in addition to looking at macro-level factors like public policies and social conditions and micro-level issues like individual choices, immigration scholars should also study influences that occur on an intermediate level, such as interpersonal encounters. Each of these three levels of analysis is essential to understanding how immigrants adapt to a new homeland and form distinct identities. As a case study for her framework, Deaux examines West Indians, exploring their perceptions of the stereotypes they face in the United States and their feelings of connection to their new home. Though race plays a limited role in the West Indies, it becomes more relevant to migrants once they arrive in the United States, where they are primarily identified by others as black, rather than Guyanese or Jamaican. Deaux's research adds to a growing literature in social psychology on stereotype threat, which suggests that negative stereotypes about one's group can hinder an individual's performance. She finds that immigrants who have been in the United States longer and identify themselves as African American suffer from the negative effects of stereotype threat more than recent immigrants. More than a discrete event, immigration can be understood as a life-long process that continues to affect people well after they have migrated. To Be an Immigrant takes a novel approach to the study of immigration, looking at how societal influences help shape immigrants and their understanding of who they are.



Contemporary Perceptions Of Immigrants As Threats Is The Perceived Criminal Immigrant Image Supported

Contemporary Perceptions of Immigrants as Threats  is the Perceived  criminal Immigrant  Image Supported  PDF
Author: Rosa Elena Chang
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 45.84 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category :
Languages : un
Pages :

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Contemporary Perceptions Of Immigrants As Threats Is The Perceived Criminal Immigrant Image Supported

by Rosa Elena Chang, Contemporary Perceptions Of Immigrants As Threats Is The Perceived Criminal Immigrant Image Supported Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Contemporary Perceptions Of Immigrants As Threats Is The Perceived Criminal Immigrant Image Supported books, This study examined Americans2 perceptions of immigrants as threats and their implications on immigration policy views as well as immigrants2 actual involvement in crime. Images of immigrant groups result from the perceived threats they pose to the crime rate, economy, political power, and nativism (Blumer 1958). I argued that these perceptions result in opposition to immigrants and support for stronger measures to exclude undocumented immigrants. Of special interest for this study was the 3criminal immigrant4 stereotype. Previous studies demonstrate that immigrants are not highly crime-involved even when they experience additional stressors during their adaptation processes. Yet, according to Agnew2s (1992) general strain theory, immigrants may be prone to criminality due to additional strains they experience while adjusting to the new country. However, many immigrants, through transnational activities maintain ties with family and friends overseas, thereby making the immigration experience less stressful. I argued in this study that immigrants2 underinvolvement in crime is partly due to their transnational ties, which may serve a protective role as social support and thus condition the effects of strains. To examine the implications for policy views of perceptions of immigrants and immigrants2 actual crime involvement, the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) and the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Survey (CILS) were used. The hypotheses were tested by conducting univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses. Overall, perceived immigrant threat affects opposition to immigrants and support for stronger measures to exclude undocumented immigrants. Among the various groups examined, the levels of opposition to immigrants differ from that of support for stronger measures to exclude undocumented immigrants. In terms of immigrants and crime, immigrants were not disproportionately involved in crime, as is widely believed by the American public. Contrary to hypotheses, however, immigrants2 strains were not significant predictors of crime, and transnational ties did not condition the effects of strains on crime. It is recommended that future research be designed using more comprehensive data set(s) that represent and reflect the growing immigration population in the United States. Particularly, research should include measurements of micro-level social dynamics specific to immigrants such as additional measures of transnational ties and resilience.



Immigrants Under Threat

Immigrants Under Threat PDF
Author: Greg Prieto
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479823929
Size: 30.23 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : SOCIAL SCIENCE
Languages : un
Pages : 237

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Immigrants Under Threat

by Greg Prieto, Immigrants Under Threat Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Immigrants Under Threat books, Everyday life as an immigrant in a deportation nation is fraught with risk, but everywhere immigrants confront repression and dispossession, they also manifest resistance in ways big and small. Immigrants Under Threat shifts the conversation from what has been done to Mexican immigrants to what they do in response. From private strategies of avoidance, to public displays of protest, immigrant resistance is animated by the massive demographic shifts that started in 1965 and an immigration enforcement regime whose unprecedented scope and intensity has made daily life increasingly perilous. Immigrants Under Threat focuses on the way the material needs of everyday life both enable and constrain participation in immigrant resistance movements.



Ethnic Visibility Context And Xenophobia

Ethnic Visibility  Context  and Xenophobia PDF
Author: Shabnam Shenasi Azari
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 20.80 MB
Format: PDF
Category :
Languages : un
Pages : 172

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Ethnic Visibility Context And Xenophobia

by Shabnam Shenasi Azari, Ethnic Visibility Context And Xenophobia Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Ethnic Visibility Context And Xenophobia books, The purpose of this study is to answer the following overarching question: italichow does ethnic diversity among immigrant and native populations impact xenophobia?italic Many studies answer this question by examining the effects of relative immigrant group size. Instead, I argue that group size increases xenophobia when immigrants are ethnically visible, crossing salient linguistic, religious, or racial boundaries. In three investigations I look at the effects of the following factors on xenophobia: ethnic diversity in the immigrant population, ethnic diversity in the broader society, and being cultural marginal. Analyzing multilevel models using cross & ndash;national data from the European Social Survey (ESS), I examine the effects of regional and national contexts of immigrant visibility on xenophobia. I define xenophobia as the perception of immigrant threat. I also test the hypothesis that average xenophobia is higher among individuals living in more ethnically diverse countries. In the second investigation, I reexamine immigrant visibility, this time using Swiss ESS data to compare across municipalities. I also consider the effects of living adjacent to rather than in an immigrant-rich community. In a final investigation, I again analyze cross-national ESS data to determine the effects of being different from the cultural majority on xenophobia. I find that xenophobia is higher among individuals living in more religiously diverse countries. Also, for those living in communities with few to no immigrants, the presence of immigrants in surrounding areas amplifies xenophobia. Comparing across countries and regions within those countries, I find that the size of the ethnically visible population does not affect xenophobia. However, immigrant visibility does increase xenophobia in the Swiss context. All other things equal, cultural minority and majority members do not appear to differ in their levels of xenophobia. However, individuals who perceive marginality tend to be more xenophobic than those who do not. The interesting exception is religious minority members, who are least xenophobic, but only when they perceive marginality. The findings cast doubt on the size argument of group threat theory, which predicts that xenophobia is higher where there are more immigrants. Even when measured in terms of the most ethnically visible and potentially most culturally threatening, immigrant group size does not explain cross & ndash;national differences in individual xenophobia. It seems to explain attitudes in some national contexts, but not others. Group size may only evoke perceptions of immigrant threat under certain necessary conditions as an interaction effect. Living adjacent to immigrant & ndash;rich communities amplifies xenophobia, but in a way that is partly attributable to contact. Counter to the predictions of cultural marginality theory, being culturally different does not universally lead one to espouse more tolerant views toward immigrants. The religious exception may stem from increased contact with immigrants, rather than simply the increased sympathy for other marginalized peoples implied by cultural marginality theory.



White Backlash

White Backlash PDF
Author: Marisa Abrajano
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691176191
Size: 16.92 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Political Science
Languages : un
Pages : 256

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White Backlash

by Marisa Abrajano, White Backlash Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download White Backlash books, White Backlash provides an authoritative assessment of how immigration is reshaping the politics of the nation. Using an array of data and analysis, Marisa Abrajano and Zoltan Hajnal show that fears about immigration fundamentally influence white Americans' core political identities, policy preferences, and electoral choices, and that these concerns are at the heart of a large-scale defection of whites from the Democratic to the Republican Party. Abrajano and Hajnal demonstrate that this political backlash has disquieting implications for the future of race relations in America. White Americans' concerns about Latinos and immigration have led to support for policies that are less generous and more punitive and that conflict with the preferences of much of the immigrant population. America's growing racial and ethnic diversity is leading to a greater racial divide in politics. As whites move to the right of the political spectrum, racial and ethnic minorities generally support the left. Racial divisions in partisanship and voting, as the authors indicate, now outweigh divisions by class, age, gender, and other demographic measures. White Backlash raises critical questions and concerns about how political beliefs and future elections will change the fate of America's immigrants and minorities, and their relationship with the rest of the nation.



The Criminalization Of Immigration Truth Lies Tragedy And Consequences

The Criminalization of Immigration  Truth  Lies  Tragedy  and Consequences PDF
Author: Robert Hartmann McNamara
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440873712
Size: 45.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Psychology
Languages : un
Pages : 219

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The Criminalization Of Immigration Truth Lies Tragedy And Consequences

by Robert Hartmann McNamara, The Criminalization Of Immigration Truth Lies Tragedy And Consequences Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download The Criminalization Of Immigration Truth Lies Tragedy And Consequences books, Presents the history of immigration to the United States; its criminalization under the Trump administration; debates over criminalization; effects on immigrants, U.S. residents, and the U.S. economy; and this country's relationships with other nations. This book offers a comprehensive understanding of past and current immigration policy in the United States and exposes falsehoods in the rhetoric and narrative portraying Latino and Mexican immigrants in the United States. Much support for intensified immigration enforcement and deportation is based on repeated statements by federal officials, including the U.S. president, that immigrants pose a threat to national security, contribute to crime, and take jobs away from native-born residents. The evidence has consistently concluded that these narratives are inaccurate. This text examines white nationalism as a backdrop to understanding the rationale behind current immigration policy and tactics. It examines how political and economic factors, broadly defined as neoliberal policies, shape the immigration narrative. It addresses the criminal justice system's applicability to immigration, law enforcement efforts, problems with immigration courts and judges, and how the detention of immigrants is part of a larger mass incarceration of people of color. Finally, the text offers insight into the reasons for massive migration, with the U.S. contributing to the problem by supporting regimes that endorse or allow humanitarian crisis. Separates fact from fiction regarding immigration problems and threats Presents a history of immigration to the United States and contrasts past federal approaches with procedures launched by the Trump administration Explains facts produced in research that are ignored by federal authorities pushing mistruths about immigrants Examines the issues and problems with immigration courts and judges, and law enforcement, and shows how the immigrant detention process is part of a larger mass incarceration of people of color in the United States Details the effects on immigrants, U.S. residents, the U.S. economy, and our relationship with other nations Shows how the U.S. itself is at fault for helping to create conditions that spur massive migration



American Sociological Review

American Sociological Review PDF
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 53.83 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Social systems
Languages : en
Pages :

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American Sociological Review

by , American Sociological Review Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download American Sociological Review books, Includes sections "Book reviews" and "Periodical literature."